The Joys & Absurdities of Modern Fatherhood
By Chris Erskine

April 17, 2018

Hardcover | $18.95
ISBN 978-1-945551-30-7
Ebook also available
ISBN 978-1-945551-31-4

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Events

Tuesday, April 24th, 7 p.m.
Vroman’s Bookstore
695 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena
Book signing

Sunday, April 22, 12:30 p.m.
Los Angles Times Festival of Books
USC campus
12:30-1:30 p.m., meet Chris and get a signed book at Prospect Park Books’ booth #103
2 pm, Chris will be in conversation with Patt Morrison and Steve Padilla in the “Newspaper and the City” panel, with a signing to follow
Panel: Seeley G. Mudd 124 —  Signing: Signing Area 4
Ticket required for panel

Thursday, June 14th, 6:30 p.m.
Book Stall
811 Elm Street, Winnetka, IL
Book signing and lively conversation on fatherhood with David McGlynn, author of One Day You’ll Thank Me: Lessons from an Unexpected Fatherhood

Note: If you’re looking for a personalized/signed copy (as mentioned at the L.A. Times Festival of Books), enter the coupon that was distributed at the event for free shipping, and add any personalization requests (or if you just want it autographed) to the “Order Notes” at checkout. If you have any questions, please send us a note at hello@prospectparkbooks.com, and be sure to leave a contact email at checkout if we need to get in touch!

Wise, wry, and witty essays on fatherhood from Chris Erskine, the beloved columnist for the Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune

Life is never peaceful in Chris Erskine’s house, what with the kids, 300-pound beagle, chronically leaky roof, and long-suffering wife, Posh. And that’s exactly the way he likes it, except when he doesn’t. Every week in the Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, and other papers, Erskine distills, mocks, and makes us laugh at the absurdities of modern fatherhood. And now, he’s gathered the very best of these witty and wise essays—and invited his kids (and maybe even Posh) to annotate them with updated commentary, which they promise won’t be too snarky.

This handsome book is the perfect gift for the father who would have everything—if he hadn’t already given it all to his kids.

Praise for Daditude

“Charming… the columns are very well written, concise, and to the point. Perfect for anyone who enjoys stories of fatherhood.”
Library Journal 

“Chris Erskine hits nothing but home runs. His work is replete with wit, context, perception, and almost always a healthy dose of compassion. I’ve loved his columns for years. You will, too.”
Al Michaels, legendary sportscaster

“No one writes columns like these. They have the warmth of family life columns from the sixties, but they are fully modern and encompass so much of life as we live it right now.… There is a haunting doubleness to these essays—always there is something elegiac. They are about the passing of time in your own family, but they stand also for a passing kind of American life.”
Caitlin Flanagan, contributing editor of The Atlantic and former staff writer at The New Yorker

“The book has a lot of heart…the essays were easy to read and a ton of fun as well.”
Dad’s of Diva’s Blog

Praise for Erskine’s Writing

Two-time Los Angeles Times Bestselling Author

“However you slice it, fatherhood has provided Erskine with some great material.”
Parents

“Filled with humorous family anecdotes that are sure to appeal to anyone who has children.”
TV Cheat Sheet

About the Author

Chris Erskine is a longtime humor columnist who mines the rich worlds of fatherhood, marriage, and suburbia; his columns are featured weekly in the Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune, and they also appear sometimes in many papers, including the Buffalo News, Orlando Sentinel, Arizona Republic, and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. The father of four and resident of a quiet LA suburb, Erskine is also a staff editor and writer at the Los Angeles Times, as well as the author of two previous books, Man of the House and Surviving Suburbia.