An Aaron Gunner Mystery
By Gar Anthony Haywood

October 2019

Paperback | $16
ISBN 978-1-945551-66-6
Ebook also available
ISBN 978-1-945551-67-3
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The highly anticipated return of private investigator Aaron Gunner

In the seventh of the acclaimed Aaron Gunner mysteries, Gunner’s work as an L.A. private investigator hits far too close to home when his beloved cousin is involved in a murder-suicide. Angry and grief-stricken, Gunner digs deep to find out what really happened, while he’s also working for a defense attorney to try to clear the name of a young Afghanistan war veteran who may have been wrongly accused of murder. Gunner grapples with loss, distrust, and a passion for the truth in this gripping story that pushes him to the edge.

Praise for Good Man Gone Bad

“Gar Anthony Haywood’s best work yet, keeping a tight focus on Aaron Gunner and his exploration of his city and the meaning of justice. More than a mystery, this book is a mirror held up to society and the world.”
Michael Connelly, New York Times-bestselling author of the Harry Bosch novels

Good Man Gone Bad is Haywood in peak form, a classic hard-boiled mystery full of sly humor and street wisdom—but also a surprisingly tender treatise on masculinity and the futility of violence. A page-turner as engaging as it is deep.”
Attica Locke, author of Bluebird, Bluebird, Heaven, My Home and The Cutting Season

Good Man Gone Bad is bracing, heart-wrenching fiction from Haywood, and the best in his Aaron Gunner series to date. Gunner is by now part of LA’s contemporary noir canon—cynical, compassionate and tireless in his pursuit of stubborn truths. Hip and raw. Don’t miss it.”
T. Jefferson Parker, New York Times–bestselling author of The Last Good Guy

“Aaron Gunner is back! And Los Angeles needs him now, more than ever. Good Man Gone Bad peels away the lies we tell each other to avoid our painful inner truths—the most powerful kind of detective story.”
Naomi Hirahara, Edgar Award–winning author of the Mas Arai mysteries

“Like the first six books in the Aaron Gunner series, this dark, brooding tale will remind readers of classic Southern California crime novelists Philip Marlowe and Ross Macdonald. Haywood’s tight, no-frills prose is outstanding, and he does a fine job of developing the characters who inhabit Gunner’s poor side of town.”
Associated Press

“Mr. Haywood—this is his seventh and best novel yet to feature Gunner—is a gifted writer with a flair for description…. The two dissimilar cases confronting Gunner test the detective’s confidence to the fullest. He sees himself, at his most insecure, as “a black pretend-cop working from the back of the Watts barbershop.” But an abundance of tenacity, courage and resourcefulness proves a lot more valuable to Gunner and his fortunate clients than a fancy office.”
Tom Nolan for Wall Street Journal

Praise for the Aaron Gunner Mysteries

“The fresh dialogue, raffish atmosphere and boldly drawn characters leave little doubt as to why Haywood’s mysteries are fast becoming hard-boiled classics.”
Entertainment Weekly (Page-Turner of the Week)

“Gunner yanks the sheet off the American nightmare of race, politics, and murder, L.A. style.”
— Acclaimed film director Spike Lee

solidly plotted seventh outing for the African-American L.A. PI… a pleasure to read… Hopefully, Gunner will be back soon.”
Publishers Weekly

“A masterful mystery writer.”
Chicago Tribune

About the Author

Gar Anthony Haywood is the Shamus and Anthony Award–winning author of twelve crime novels, including six featuring African-American private investigator Aaron Gunner. His novels have been praised by the New York Times, earned starred reviews from Kirkus and Publishers Weekly, been optioned by such filmmakers as Spike Lee, and held spots on the Los Angeles Times Bestseller List. The Los Angeles resident has written for both the Los Angeles Times and the New York Times, as well as teleplays and screenplays for such series as The District. He is a former president of the Mystery Writers of America’s Southern California chapter.